Diversity Statement

December 9, 2016

We, the undersigned faculty and staff in the Department of Asian Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, welcome Chancellor Folt’s recently published statements on inclusion and diversity.  Likewise, we emphatically reaffirm University policy on discrimination, academic freedom, and social justice.

We are deeply concerned that recent statements and actions by national and international political leaders targeting historically less powerful ethno-racial identities threaten inclusion, diversity, and academic freedom in addition to everyone’s safety and security. We condemn the recent racist incidents—hate speech, physical violence, vandalism, etc.—that have taken place right here on our campus. We encourage administrators at all levels of the University to also publicly condemn such incidents as one important step towards eradicating them.

In response, we pledge to continue to uphold justice and multicultural literacy by insisting that our classes and community include everyone and do not discriminate against anyone.

Dongsoo Bang
Fadi Bardawil
Jan Bardsley
Ash Barnes
Uffe Bergeton
Luoyi Cai
Mark Driscoll
Lini Ge
Zeina Halabi
Lori Harris
Didem Havlioglu
Li-ling Hsiao
Fumi Iwashita
Ji-Yeon Jo
SooJin Lee
Wendan Li
Jia Lin
Pamela Lothspeich
Khalid Shahu
Jing Stimpson
Robin Visser
Claudia Yaghoobi
Nadia Yaqub
Yi Zhou

Afroz Taj: Artist After Hours

November 21, 2016

You may know Dr. Afroz Taj as a professor of South Asian Studies, but did you know that he’s also a poet, stage actor, and host of his own popular radio show?  And he’s in the spotlight this week on Carolina’s “Artists After Hours.”  Read all about it here.

Guest Lecture with Mostafa Abedinifard

October 26, 2016

On September 1, 2016, Mostafa Abedinifard of McEwan University in Canada, gave a guest lecture via skype on the topic of “Masculinities and Male Privilege in Asghar Farhadi’s A Separation” for Claudia Yaghoobi’s “Gender and Sexuality in the Middle East” class. To provide students with the theoretical background, Abedinifard began with a discussion of the late 1960s Men’s Rights Movement and moved to the 1990s Mythopoetic Men’s Movement and highlighted the claims made by these movements about the crisis in masculinity. Abedinifard also provided students with an understanding of the various waves of masculinity studies in the west and how these waves were anti- or pro-feminism. All the while, Abedinifard interacted with students, asking challenging questions and gradually more students interacted with him. This was very impressive as many students are generally reluctant to participate in discussions with a guest lecturer, and Abedinifard acknowledged to the students their “very good” efforts and “intelligent” questions.

Matt Coss receives a Chancellor’s Award

April 19, 2016

Senior Chinese major Matt Coss has received the Class of 1938 Joseph F. Patterson Jr. & Alice M. Patterson International Leadership Award! Established in 1977, this award is presented to the undergraduate who has made the most significant contribution to increasing international awareness and understanding.

Department of Asian Studies Statement on HB2

April 18, 2016

In light of the recent passage of NC House Bill 2 (HB2), members of the UNC Chapel Hill Department of Asian Studies affirm our commitment to fostering a welcoming and inclusive environment.  We are fully committed to the University’s Policy Statement on Non-Discrimination, which prohibits discrimination and harassment based on “age, color, disability, gender, gender expression, gender identity, genetic information, national origin, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, or veteran status.”  (See the full university policy at http://sexualassaultanddiscriminationpolicy.unc.edu/about/our-policy/.) We also endorse the protections encoded in Federal Title VII and Title IX regulations.

 

Caroline Zullo is Carolina’s first Carnegie Junior Fellow

April 13, 2016

Caroline Zullo, an Arabic minor from the class of 2015, has been selected for the elite Carnegie Junior Fellows Program. The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace has given this prestigious award for 25 years, and Caroline is the very first ever recipient from Carolina. The Junior Fellows, who are recent graduates with career interests in international affairs, work in Washington as research assistants at the Carnegie Endowment. Click here for the full story.

Gang Yue Combines Research, Teaching, and Volunteerism with Tibet NGO

April 4, 2016

Machik is a Washington, D.C.-based international NGO that operates on the rural Tibetan Plateau and beyond. Its work is rooted in community-based education and, in addition to running schools, extends to youth leaderships training programs, energy and environmental projects, and initiatives to increase women’s access to education and economic resources. After inviting Dr. Losang Ragbey, Machik’s executive director, to speak to his ASIA 453 class, Dr. Gang Yue began working with Machik himself, visiting and engaging with one of its schools in Tibet and speaking by invitation to public audiences of diverse backgrounds. He also refers UNC students to Machik’s volunteer and internship programs. Dr. Yue joined the Machik Advisory Board in 2008 and regularly participates in teleconferences with other board members. He considers this volunteer work part of his broader ethnographic fieldwork, as his interactions with Tibetans and multinational volunteers and supporters have enriched his scholarly work and informed its ethos. For Dr. Yue’s latest participation as a panelist in the second MachikWeekendX (MWx), visit http://www.machik.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=433&Itemid=136